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09-10-2008
Passengers may wave goodbye to turbulence
By Richard Alleyne

Air passengers can look forward to smoother, safer and more economical flights thanks to a new method of predicting turbulence, scientists claim.

Avoiding storms and high winds has always been relatively easy for pilots as long as they could spot the trouble from their cockpit.

But an invisible form of violent air movement known as clear-air turbulence can cause the sudden bumpiness and even plummeting during flights that are responsible for thousands of injuries every year.

09-10-2008
British aircrew in cabin drama at 30,000ft
The British aircrew of a jet had to wrestle a passenger to the floor of their aircraft after he tried to open the cabin door at 30,000ft.

The 31-year-old German man had begun arguing with two other travellers and is said to have bitten one and punched the other in the face. He then asked to be seated away from the pair.

But after he was moved he got up from his seat and tried to open the door of the plane.

09-10-2008
Did a laptop cause airliner terror plunge?
Passengers using laptop computers or playing electronic games could have caused the terrifying plunge of a Qantas airliner which left a dozen travellers seriously injured.

The Airbus \'ran amok\' over the Indian Ocean after a computer glitch in the autopilot controls.

Passengers who were not strapped in were thrown from their seats, hitting ceiling panels with their heads.

Investigators plan to interview every passenger to find out if any were using electronic equipment.
04-09-2008
Passengers on jet in five-minute plunge say crew did not know what to do.
Investigators began searching for the cause of a sudden loss of cabin pressure in a Ryanair aircraft as passengers on board the flight said that they thought they would die and accused the cabin crew of not knowing what to do.

The Boeing 737 flight from Bristol to Gerona, Spain, dropped thousands of feet after suffering a “brutal decompression” on Monday night. Sixteen people were taken to hospital complaining of ear pain after the pilot landed the aircraft safely at Limoges airport in central France.


04-09-2008
How Much for a Sip of Water on This Flight?
Posted on: Monday, 18 August 2008, 18:00 CDT

By Micheline Maynard

Kathryn Carlson contributed reporting.

*

As far as many airlines are concerned, you are no longer just a passenger. You are an opportunity to raise "ancillary revenue." And when it comes to charging for things that were once free, the sky is the limit.

In just a few short months, airlines, particularly those in the United States, have discovered to their glee that their customers are willing to pay for most everything from checking luggage to soft drinks to pillows and blankets - and are doing so without much fuss.

With that knowledge in hand, the airlines are not about to stop.
04-09-2008
Qantas oxygen cylinder blew up, probe confirms
Australian investigators confirmed Friday that the explosion of an oyxgen cylinder blew a hole in the side of a Qantas Airways airliner in late July, but said the cause of the explosion had not yet been determined.

In an interim report on the July 25 incident that fordced an emergency landing of the Boeing 747-400, the Australian Transport Safety Bureau said that the cylinder blew a hole almost 2 meters long and 1.5 meters wide, or 6.5 feet long and 5 feet wide, in the aircraft\'s fuselage. The cylinder then rocketed up through the cabin floor, hitting the handle of an emergency exit and punching a hole 23 centimeters, or 9 inches, wide - the dimater of the cylinder - in an overhead baggage compartment.




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