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04-10-2007
Minister sits on damning report into impact of Heathrow Noise
By Ben Webster – Transport Correspondent
Up to 2m people are hit by noise pollution
Study undermines plans for third runway.
Aircraft noise causes much more annoyance than previously thought, according to a study for the Department for Transport which the Government is attempting to conceal while it plans the expansion of Heathrow.
30-09-2007
DIRECTIONS - New X-ray Machines promise to cut queues
By Chris Haslam
New x-ray machines capable of detecting explosives and liquids could lead to a relaxation of the restrictions on hand luggage, says the airports operator BAA.
Britain is the only country in the world that limits carry-on luggage to just one item, and the Department for Transport says the regulation will remain in place until BAA and other airport operators can prove that security delays will not be increased when it is lifted.
The technology takes multiple scans of bags in the same time it takes current machines to take a single picture – allowing instant identification of suspicious items. It will be installed at all seven airports run by BAA by next March.

27-09-2007
See-all airport X-ray
Sophisticated scanner automatically detects bombs in hand luggage
By Ray Massey, Transport Editor
A new generation of airport X-ray machines that speed up security checks and could lead to less stringent hand luggage regulations were unveiled yesterday.
The technology could halve the security queues for boarding passengers.
More than 200 of the advanced scanners - which can detect explosives and liquids as well as guns and knives - are to be installed across major airports, including 60 at Heathrow.

27-09-2007
Risk of venuous thrombosis in long-haul flights
In a paper published this week in the open-access journal PLoS Medicine Frits Rosendaal and colleagues from Leiden University Medical Center, Academic Medical Center Amsterdam and Nestlé Medical Services, provide the first absolute estimate of risk of venous thrombosis after air travel. The authors surveyed 8,755 employees of international companies collecting data on their travel and whether or not they developed thromboses (deep vein thromboses and pulmonary emboli) afterwards. The employees were followed up for a total of 38,910 person-years, during 6,872 of which they were exposed to a long-haul flight. In the follow-up period, 53 thromboses occurred, 22 within 8 wk of a long-haul flight. The researchers then calculated that there was an incidence rate of 3.2/1,000 thromboses per year exposed to long haul travel compared with 1.0/1,000 per year in individuals not exposed to air travel; this rate is equivalent to a risk of one event per 4,656 long-haul flights. Venous thrombosis has been linked to air travel since 1951 but despite a number of previous studies the absolute risk of symptomatic venous thrombosis after long-haul travel has not previously been calculated. Knowledge of the absolute risk of symptomatic thrombosis after air travel is important so that travellers can accurately assess their risk of developing thromboses and decide whether prophylactic measures against thromboses are worthwhile. The authors found that the risk of thromboses increased with exposure to more flights within a short time frame and with increasing duration of flights. The risk was particularly high in employees under age 30 y, women who used oral contraceptives, and individuals who were particularly short, tall, or overweight. The incidence of thromboses was highest in the first 2 weeks after travel and gradually decreased to baseline after 8 weeks. Although the authors note that this study was performed in a working population with a mean age of 40 y and go on to say that the absolute risk of venous thrombosis in the general population is likely to be higher than the risk found here, they conclude however that “The results of our study do not justify the use of potentially dangerous prophylaxis such as anticoagulant therapy for all long-haul air travellers, since this may do more harm than good. However, for some subgroups of people with a highly increased risk, the risk–benefit ratio may favour the use of prophylactic measures.”

The study was conducted as part of the WRIGHT project (World Health Organization Research In to Global Hazards of Travel), an international research project under the auspices of the World Health Organization.



Citation: Kuipers S, Cannegieter SC, Middeldorp S, Robyn L, Buller HR, et al. (2007) The absolute risk of
27-09-2007
Airport Valuables Shared By Staff
By David Millward
Valuable goods are being shared out among Heathrow staff after being confiscated at security gates before flights, it has been claimed.

According to a watchdog group, items such pens costing up £200, have gone missing.

Perfume and men\'s toiletries are also alleged to have "disappeared" the Heathrow Airport Consultative Committee claims.


25-09-2007
Under-30s at highest risk of DVT on flights
By Jenny Hope, Medical Correspondent

The under-30s are at the greatest risk of developing a life-threatening blood clot on long-haul flights, researchers have warned.
Air passengers who are short, tall or overweight, as well as women on the Pill, are also in greater danger of deep vein thrombosis, according to the study.
Researchers in the Netherlands looked at nearly 9,000 employees of multi-national firms, logging the amount of flying they did and whether or not they developed blood clots.



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