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Fasten your seatbelt. Yes, YOU
By George Bibel
Friday, January 25, 2008
GRAND FORKS, North Dakota:
What\'s the point of listening to the safety instructions given by flight attendants? If there\'s a crash, everybody dies, right?
Most airline passengers apparently feel this way. More than half of passengers in a large study by the National Transportation Safety Board admitted to routinely ignoring the flight attendants, heeding no more than half of their little spiel. But what the flight attendants say can very well save lives, because in any airplane accident, passengers are five times more likely to survive than to die.

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PWB Test
Whoopeeee! ! !
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PWB Test
Whoppeeee! ! !
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Jet lag cure: Avoid eating in the air
By Fiona MacRae Science Reporter
Given the quality of some airline meals, this may be the best advice yet.
If you want to beat jet lag, travel on an empty stomach. Not eating until arrival could help the body rapidly adjust to a new time zone, a study suggests.
Shift workers could also benefit from the fresh insight into biological rhythms, say researchers from Harvard Medical School.
Studies on mice show the brain has two internal "clocks".

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Airline food linked to misery of jet lag
By Roger Highfield, Science Editor

The key to beating jet lag on long haul flights is not to eat the airline food, according to scientists.The advice for international travellers comes from a study that shows the timing of meals has a much bigger effect on the body clock than previously thought.Scientists have known for decades that meal times can affect the body clock, which has a natural period of about 24.2 hours. But they have always thought that the key factor is light.Now a team at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Centre, Boston,


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