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07-12-2007
Air Rage Incidents Rise 62pc in a year.
Air rage on passenger planes has increased by 62 per cent over the last year.

Drunkenness and violence by rowdy passengers and those refusing to obey no-smoking rules have fuelled the rise, figures published yesterday show.

There were 2,219 incidents in 2006-2007 compared to 1,359 the previous year – and 2,161 of those cases were classed as ‘significant’, the other 58 as ‘serious’.


23-11-2007
Fat flyer is forced to buy two seats
A 27 stone passenger who had his stomach measured at an airport check-in desk then was told he had to buy two seats has been awarded £5,000 in damages.

Jean-Jacques Jauffret, 43, was approached by AirFrance staff as he tried to board a flight from New Delhi to Paris.

Mr Jauffret, a cinema screenwriter, said: ‘A women came from behind the desk with a tape measure and measured my waist in front of dozens of people. Then she said, “People as fat as you need to buy two seats.”

‘I asked her if I could simply have an empty seat beside me but she said the flight was almost full. It was highly embarrassing.

Mr Jauffret’s original ticket cost him £500 and he paid £320 for the extra seat.

Yesterday, a court in Paris ruled that because there were still several empty seats on the plane, the airline should have ‘accommodated his corpulence’ rather than make him buy another seat.

It added: “The way the matter was handled was humiliating for Mr Jauffret.’

The court ordered the airline to pay Mr Jauffret £5,000 compensation and reimburse the cost of the second seat.

Extracted from The Daily Mail 23.11.07

19-11-2007
Worlds First Fully Automated Sales Terminal
The world’s first fully automated sales terminal is now in operation at Zurich’s Airport Forum. Nokia cell phones. Cannon cameras. Sony Ericsson headsets. Swatch watches. Ultimate iPods: the boxIN device offers a wealth of luxury items 24 hours a day. All available in an easy-to-use credit card process.

Extracted from Swiss Magazine 11, 2007/78

19-11-2007
Risk of venuous thrombosis in long-haul flights
In a paper published this week (24 September 2007) in the open-access journal PLoS Medicine Frits Rosendaal and colleagues from Leiden University Medical Center, Academic Medical Center Amsterdam and Nestlé Medical Services, provide the first absolute estimate of risk of venous thrombosis after air travel. The authors surveyed 8,755 employees of international companies collecting data on their travel and whether or not they developed thromboses (deep vein thromboses and pulmonary emboli) afterwards. The employees were followed up for a total of 38,910 person-years, during 6,872 of which they were exposed to a long-haul flight. In the follow-up period, 53 thromboses occurred, 22 within 8 wk of a long-haul flight. The researchers then calculated that there was an incidence rate of 3.2/1,000 thromboses per year exposed to long haul travel compared with 1.0/1,000 per year in individuals not exposed to air travel; this rate is equivalent to a risk of one event per 4,656 long-haul flights.
16-11-2007
Frequent Traveler - Hotels take notice of sleepwalking clients
By Roger Collis
Few things are more disconcerting on a trip than to wake up in a hotel room, and for a few bewildering seconds wonder where I am, which hotel, which city, why am I there? Even which day it is, never mind the time.

But a release the other day from British budget hotel chain Travelodge, reporting that sleepwalking among guests increased seven-fold in the past year, mostly involving naked men, has set me worrying about a more alarming kind of amnesia: What am I getting up to while I\'m asleep?!


14-11-2007
IATA Standard Paves Way for Global Mobile Phone Check-In
The International Air Transport Association (IATA) announced a global standard that paves the way for global mobile phone check-in using two-dimensional (2D) bar codes. Passengers register their mobile number with an airline at the time of booking to receive a text message with a 2D bar code, or instructions to download it. The bar code becomes the boarding pass and is read directly from the screen of the mobile device, eliminating paper from the check-in process. Historically, airline global applications for mobile phone technology have been restricted due to different regional formats. The IATA standard uses existing codes: Aztec and Datamatrix which are used extensively in Europe and North America; and QR which is widely used in Japan. All three technologies can be read by a single scanner type that is readily available globally. IATA will work with airlines to develop standardised processes and guidelines that facilitate global implementation. The industry has set a deadline of the end of 2010 to implement 100% bar coded boarding passes (BCBP). Upon full implementation, BCBP will save the industry over $500 million annually. A 2 D standard for paper bar coded passes was established in 2005 and is the basis for Web check-in

Extracted from Washington Aviation Summary November 2007



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