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29-05-2008
Airline food linked to misery of jet lag
By Roger Highfield, Science Editor

The key to beating jet lag on long haul flights is not to eat the airline food, according to scientists.The advice for international travellers comes from a study that shows the timing of meals has a much bigger effect on the body clock than previously thought.Scientists have known for decades that meal times can affect the body clock, which has a natural period of about 24.2 hours. But they have always thought that the key factor is light.Now a team at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Centre, Boston, Massachusetts, has discovered a second "food-related clock" which can override the "light-based" master clock when we are hungry.The findings are reported in the journal Science.Prof Clifford Saper, the report\'s senior author, says: "If, for example, you are travelling from the US to Japan, you are forced to adjust to an 11-hour time difference."Because the body\'s biological clock can only shift a small amount each day, it takes the average person about a week to adjust to the new time zone.
29-05-2008
Differential Rescue of Light - Beat Jetlag
Science 23 May 2008:
Vol. 320. no. 5879, pp. 1074 - 1077
DOI: 10.1126/science.1153277
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Reports
Differential Rescue of Light- and Food-Entrainable Circadian Rhythms
Patrick M. Fuller, Jun Lu, Clifford B. Saper*
When food is plentiful, circadian rhythms of animals are powerfully entrained by the light-dark cycle. However, if animals have access to food only during their normal sleep cycle, they will shift most of their circadian rhythms to match the food availability. We studied the basis for entrainment of circadian rhythms by food and light in mice with targeted disruption of the clock gene Bmal1, which lack circadian rhythmicity. Injection of a viral vector containing the Bmal1 gene into the suprachiasmatic nuclei of the hypothalamus restored light-entrainable, but not food-entrainable, circadian rhythms. In contrast, restoration of the Bmal1 gene only in the dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus restored the ability of animals to entrain to food but not to light. These results demonstrate that the dorsomedial hypothalamus contains a Bmal1-based oscillator that can drive food entrainment of circadian rhythms.

Department of Neurology, Division of Sleep Medicine, and Program in Neuroscience, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02215, USA.


* To whom correspondence should be addressed. E-mail: csaper@bidmc.harvard.edu


28-05-2008
EU foreign ministers bags among the 28000 held in storage after T5 fiasco
By RAY MASSEY - Last updated at 23:27pm on 31st March 2008
Almost 30,000 bags have been lost in the chaos at Heathrow\'s Terminal 5, it has emerged.
It had been thought that 15,000 suitcases were stuck in storage, following problems with the baggage handling system.

04-04-2008
Naomi Campbell had to be removed by police from a flight out of Heathrow last ni
By Murad Ahmed

The model was then arrested on suspicion of assaulting a police officer as she was hauled away from the first class lounge of Terminal 5 “ranting and screaming”.

A Metropolitan Police spokesman said that a woman was arrested at the terminal for an assault on police, but refused to give her name.


03-04-2008
BA luggage farce deepens as bags are sent to Italy
by NEIL SEARS, DAN NEWLING and LUCY BALLINGER

The British Airways lost luggage farce deepened last night when it emerged that the airline is sending thousands of bags out of Heathrow to be sorted through in Milan, only for them then to be sent back to England.


19-03-2008
Leather, leg-room and lobster: superjumbo is here
By Sam Leith, aboard the Airbus A380
It was beneath the arching water cannon of fire engines, and with a cargo of exuberant aviation groupies in specially made T-shirts, that the largest passenger aircraft in history taxied to a halt for the first time on British soil.
"Water cannons?" asked one woman passenger. "Why water cannons? Couldn\'t they have had fireworks?"
An answer involving the proximity of gunpowder and jet fuel seemed to satisfy her curiosity.
As the superjumbo bumped on to the runway, we looked out to see an honour guard of ground crew in fluorescent tabards. It was as if Heathrow had downed tools to witness the arrival of this airborne leviathan.



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