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01-03-2006
During the German presidency of the European Union
During the German presidency of the European Union, it was decided to further protect workers from noise injury at their place of work, by reducing the maximum and continuous levels workers may be exposed to. One of the major new provisions, was that aviation would now be covered by the new legislation. The UK produced the Noise at Work Regulations 2005 which come into effect on 6th April 2006.

BALPA - Extracted from Gadgets & Gizmos – by Mike Buckley – February: March 2006

01-03-2006
Taxes That Won’t Fly
Business Europe/By Giovanni Bisignani

European governments are competing among themselves to introduce the most absurd taxes on airline passengers. They say it’s all to fund worthy causes that everyone supports. But these new taxes will hurt the very thing they’re supposed to help.

Two in particular could come into force this summer: a Swedish tax purportedly to improve the environment, and a French tax to fund aid for developing countries. The environment and development are important, but what’s that got to do with airline travel?


01-03-2006
IATA Calls for European Airport Regulator
IATA Calls for European Airport Regulator
IATA called for a European Authority to oversee economic regulation for airports handling over 5 million passengers per year. Europe has 15 of the most expensive airports in the world, said IATA Director General Giovanni Bisignani, and airlines and their customers pay airports and air navigation service providers $42 billion each year – 10% of operating costs.

Extracted from Greenberg Traurig Washington Aviation Summary, March 2006 Edition


01-03-2006
UK to Investigate Fresh Air Pumped into Aircraft Cabins
UK to Investigate Fresh Air Pumped into Aircraft Cabins
An inquiry into whether fresh air pumped into aircraft can pose a threat to passengers and air crew will be conducted by the UK Transport Department Aviation Health Working Group, in response to complaints from the British Aviation Health Working Group, in response to complaints from the British Airline Pilots Association (BALPA) and some flight attendants. A similar investigation funded by the U.S. FAA is also under way. Potential dangers of re-circulated cabin air have long been debated, but concern about what is supposed to be fresh air is a newer development. BALPA said air crew members have complained of nausea, headaches, and flu-like symptoms from contaminated air, which can also have an impact on passengers. BALPA is demanding better maintenance and that engines be fitted with filters to prevent engine oil and other particles form seeping into the air-conditioning system.

Extracted from Greenberg Traurig Washington Aviation Summary, March 2006 Edition


01-03-2006
Alaska Airlines Sued Over Cabin Pressure Loss
Alaska Airlines Sued Over Cabin Pressure Loss
Alaska Airlines and its ground services contractor, UK-based Menzies Aviation, are being sued for negligence by six passengers who in December flew on Flight 536 from Seattle to Burbank. The passengers contend they suffered hearing damage when their airplane lost cabin pressure at 26,000 feet. A hole in the fuselage caused by an unreported ground service collision prior to takeoff led to what the plaintiffs called an explosive and violent decompression that left them with physical and emotional injuries. The pilots made an emergency descent to a lower altitude and returned to Seattle-Tacoma. Alaska recently has had to turn back several flights because of cabin pressure problems, but said the incidents involved different types of aircraft and appear to be unrelated. The airline has begun pressurization inspections of its entire fleet.

Extracted from Greenberg Traurig Washington Aviation Summary, March 2006 Edition





01-03-2006
Activation of coagulation system during air travel: a crossover study
AJM Schreijer, S C Cannegieter, J C M Meijers, S Middeldorp, H R Buller, F R Rosendaal

Summary
Background. There is an increased risk of venous thrombosis after air travel, but the underlying mechanism is unclear. Our aim was to ascertain whether flying leads to a hypercoagulable state.




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