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06-05-2006
TravelHealth: Lyme disease
When my five-year-old son developed a ring-shaped rash on his face two summers ago, he was fortunate: not only was his father a doctor, but we were on Nantucket Island – a resort popular with staff from Massachusetts General Hospital.

There was a conference around the pool, a diagnosis of Lyme disease, and treatment within two hours of the first symptoms.


26-04-2006
Accidents with passenger fatalities double in 2005
For worldwide scheduled air services with aircraft seating seven passengers or more, there were 18 aircraft accidents with 713 passenger fatalities in 2005, compared to nine with 203 fatalities in 2004, reports the international Civil Aviation Organisation (ICAO), excluding aircraft accidents caused by acts of unlawful interference. For non-scheduled operations for aircraft of the same size, there were 18 accidents in 2005 with 278 passenger fatalities. Six acts of unlawful interference were recorded in 2005, in which three persons were killed and 60 were injured. U.S. civil aviation accidents increased from 1,717 in 2004 to 1,779 in 2005, reports the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB). Total fatalities decreased from 636 to 600; most occurring in general aviation and air taxi operations. For Part 121 scheduled operations, 32 accidents were recorded in 2005, including three that resulted in 22 fatalities, 20 of them when a Chalk’s Ocean Airways Grumman G73T broke up shortly after takeoff in Miami.
26-04-2006
Four billion passengers worldwide in 2005
Four billion passengers passed through world airports last year, reports Airport Council International (ACI), 6% over 2004. International passengers totalled 1.6 billion, an 8% increase, and freight at 42.7 million metric tons, a 3% increase. The world’s five busiest passengers airports, as in 2004, were Atlanta, Chicago O’Hare, London Heathrow, Tokyo Haneda and Los Angeles. Fourteenth-ranked Beijing, with 41 million passengers, up to 17.5% saw the greatest increase among the top 30 global airports. Total aircraft movements increased 2% with 66.8 million.

Extracted from The Washington Aviation Summary April 2006


26-04-2006
Noise monitoring system installed at San Francisco Airport
A new noise monitoring system is now operational at San Francisco International Airport. The $1.8 million program is comprised of 29 noise-monitoring terminals positioned between San Francisco and Redwood City that feed information into a central system at the airport. The data are then correlated with actual flight information to accurately identify which planes emit noise that exceeds acceptable limits for the area. Installation of the Lochard Corp. ANOMS8 system began in early 2005, testing was completed in late January this year, and certification by the California Department of Transport (Caltrans) was awarded in March. The system also will be rolled out at San Diego, Long Beach, Torrance, Sacramento, Los Angeles International, Ontario and Van Nuys airports. Lochard noise monitoring systems for Los Angeles World Airports and BAA London airports will provide integrated monitoring for multiple airports including area wide flight tracking. The Los Angeles system will use 75 Lochard Internet EMU noise monitors to achieve the long term acoustic precision required by Caltrans.

Extracted from Washington Aviation Summary, April 2006, Greenberg Traurig


26-04-2006
No food, no water, no seat…. And you thought flying couldn’t get any more uncomf
From Charles Bremner In Paris

“CATTLE-CLASS” travel has been given new meaning by a pioneering concept circulating in the airline industry: flights on which some passengers remain standing.

The notion of a standing-room section is a logical conclusion to the cut-throat quest by airlines to milk revenue in the face of soaring costs, industry experts say.


24-04-2006
Compression stockings for preventing deep vein thrombosis in airline passengers
M Clarke, S Hopewell, E Juszczak, A Eisinga, M Kjeldstrøm

The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2006 Issue 2 (Status: New)
Copyright © 2006 The Cochrane Collaboration. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD004002.pub2 This version first published online: 19 April 2006 in Issue 2, 2006
Date of Most Recent Substantive Amendment: 7 February 2006




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