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16-06-2008
Holiday Jets in Fumes Drama
NOXIOUS-smelling fumes have poured into airline cabins and flight decks - sparking alerts on EIGHT Manchester flights.

On one flight pilots donned emergency oxygen masks, while another air crew felt \'light headed\' after take-off, according to official reports obtained exclusively by the M.E.N.

Passengers and three cabin attendants reported feeling so unwell from \'noxious fumes\' with a \'gas-type\' smell on a third plane that a full security alert was triggered.

Paramedics were only allowed on board the jet following an emergency landing after the Army was alerted and it was held for 90 minutes by armed police.


16-06-2008
Back to the day job Naomi Campbell returns to the catwalk after claiming she was
By Mail On Sunday Reporter
Last updated at 5:32 PM on 22nd June 2008
Supermodel Naomi Campbell returned to the catwalk yesterday after avoiding a prison sentence for an air rage assault on a British Airways flight.
The 38-year-old model appeared to be back to her best as she sailed down the runway at the Dolce & Gabbana lingerie at Milan Fashion Week.
Campbell had accused BA of racism, claiming cabin crew staff called her a ‘Gollywog’.

16-06-2008
Strike threat at BA as pay cut plan is uncovered
British Airways could face a wave of strikes this summer after it was revealed it may create a subsidiary firm to employits 12,000 cabin crew on worse pay and conditions.

As one of a series of cost-cutting measures being considered because of the failing economy and the spiralling price of aviation fuel - which has leapt by 84 per cent in the past year - the plan would scrap pay structures and see staff transferred to the new firm on reduced rates.

Last night, senior officials of the Unite union - representing cabin crew - threatened strike action unless the plan was withdrawn.

A senior union source said: BA wants to pay us less and wreck our working conditions. There will be big trouble over this.

However, Simon Talling-Smith, BA\'s head of Inflight Services, said: \'BA, like all airlines, needs to make plans to survive the economic downturn. Inflight Services has been asked to explore options to address costs and managers have been spending time on this.

As always, we explore different options, many of which we never pursue. At this point, the evaluations are not finished and any proposals are not complete.\'

Extracted from The DailyMail 22.6.08
16-06-2008
Safest plane seats are in the aisle (but in business class it is every man for h
By Ben Webster - Transport Correspondent

It is the question that most nervous flyers ask themselves whenever they board an aircraft: where is the safest place to sit? The answer is now much clearer after an exhaustive study of 105 accidents and personal accounts from almost 2,000 survivors of how they managed to escape from crash landings and onboard fires.



16-06-2008
Travellers back no frills airlines over BA
Consumers give national carriers the thumbs-down in survey on service. Charles Starmer-Smith examines the results
British travellers believe that no-frills carriers offer better service than British Airways, according to new research.
In the survey of more than 30,000 travellers by the consumer magazine Which?, BA achieved a satisfaction rating of 55 per cent for its short-haul services – less than Wizz Air (69 per cent), Jet2 (61 per cent), easyJet (59 per cent), Flybe (59 per cent) and Bmi Baby (58 per cent).
Travellers gave ratings for performance by cabin staff, pre-flight (check-in staff, baggage and check-in policies and seat allocation), comfort, cleanliness, dealing with delays, food, entertainment and value for money.


16-06-2008
AIRLINES STILL DODGING COMPENSATION
Airlines continue to flout European laws over compensation for cancelled flights. Passengers can claim compensation of up to £475 for a cancelled flight, but airlines can avoid these costs if they cite extraordinary circumstances, such as mechanical breakdown or poor weather. There is currently no obligation for carriers to record the reasons for cancellations, which affect about 2.7% of all departures.

Flight-data analyst Hendrik Noorderhaven – whose company, Euclaim.co.uk, pursues passengers compensation claims in return for 24% of the payout – says it is too easy for airlines to exploit the compensation exemption loophole when flights have in fact been cancelled for purely commercial or logistical reasons.

“Currently, the only place a technical malfunction has to be registered is in the aircraft’s logbook,” says Noorderhaven, “but it’s possible to track every aircraft in the world through it’s tail number. So, when an airline says a flight has been cancelled because a specific aircraft has a technical problem, we can double-check.”




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