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06-01-2007
Caught Up in the BA bag fiasco
By Joanna Symons
Thousands of airline passengers are still waiting to be reunited with their baggage following the Christmas airport chaos. British Airways admitted this week that missing luggage had not been delivered to customers. Joanna Symons, of Telegraph Travel, was among those to lose a bag and says the "world\'s favourite airline" should do better.
It is always a tense moment when your bag fails to appear on the baggage carousel, but it is an all too familiar feeling for many BA passengers who, like me, flew from Heathrow in December. I was travelling to the Alps for a short skiing holiday with my family when my son\'s bag failed to appear. At first we were not too bothered - about half the passengers on our flight to Geneva on December 17 seemed to be waiting, too. Then, as the belt stopped and our flight number disappeared from the screen, we became aware of a queue forming at the lost luggage office.

17-12-2006
BA safety rule hikes bag price
By MAURICE CHITTENDEN

BRITISH Airways passengers face extra charges of up to £120 a bag for “excess” weight on their luggage because of changes inspired by health and safety concerns for the airline’s 4,000 baggage handlers. The maximum weight for any bag is being reduced by almost 30% to 23kg from February. An economy traveller to the Far East who is currently charged £34.40 for one extra kilo above the permitted bag weight will now face having to fork out for a new bag, stash the excess inside and pay BA £120 to put it in the hold.
17-12-2006
Sleeping on cheese-gratersAs BAA faces new calls for regulation, Matt Rudd votes
I might be risking a particularly vigorous rubber-glove probe the next time I fly, but I’d just like to say that Heathrow is the worst airport on the planet. Sure, Miami is hellish, Bangalore is plagued by mozzies and Lagos is just plain suicidal, but Heathrow trumps the lot with its own special brand of misery. It is, as I’m sure you’re aware, the most sprawling, ugly, depressing place to begin or end a holiday, a twilight zone of queues, rip-off restaurants, broken travolators and seating made of cheese-graters so you can’t sit down, you just have to keep shopping in the overpriced shops. Then there are the toilets: they can leave you psychologically scarred for life. The last time I risked it, while waiting for my (delayed, of course) luggage at Terminal 4, I slid across a fetid floor to a toilet so blocked, it looked as if someone had patted it down with a spade. I still have Vietnam-style flashbacks.
05-12-2006
BA Passengers share first class cabin with a corpose
By Ray Massey – Transport Editor
First Class travellers on a British Airways transatlantic flight were horrified when they were forced to sit next to a dead body for three hours.
The elderly passenger had died of a heart attack just minutes earlier and was carried into their cabin to continue the journey to America.
It followed a mid air drama in which a doctor and crew lost a 35 minute battle to resuscitate the man after he suffered a cardiac arrest in business class where he was travelling with his wife.
Four stewards and a fellow passenger then struggled to carry the deceased American in his seventies into their exclusive area - where tickets cost up to £6,669 return.

01-12-2006
Qatar Airways Opens Premium Terminal
Qatar Airways inaugurated its Premium Terminal for first and business-class passengers. The $80 million facility can handle 800 passengers an hour. Amenities include dedicated e-gates for passengers with biometric data and exclusive check-in, duty-free shopping, conference rooms, a nursery and play area, spa services, restaurants and prayer rooms for both sexes. Premium passengers flying on Qatar-operated code shares may use the terminal. CEO Akbar al-Baker said premium-type buses will ferry passengers to the aircraft, instead of limousines and special vehicles which pose a safety hazard on the tarmac. A new apron is being constructed east of the runway where up to 10 wide-bodies can park. Seating in the airline’s premium cabins has been increased from between 18 and 24 to 42.
Extracted from Washington Aviation Summary – December 2006 – Kirstein & Young PLLC/Attorneys at Law



25-11-2006
Alcohol and illicit smoking contribute to a big increase in violence on planes.
The number of incidents of so called "air rage" on British aircraft has doubled since 2003. Between March 2005 and March 2006 there were 1,359 reports of disruptive behaviour on flights, of which 56 were deemed to be "serious", according to new government figures.
This was twice the number of such cases in 2003/4 and six per cent higher than last year\'s total.
According to the Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) "serious" is defined as behaviour "actually threatening flight or personal safety, or [which] has the potential to do so if the situation escalates".
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