AH Shop AH Objectives About AH Surveys Research Contact AH Legal Action Support AH AH Home Useful links
 
Aviation Health News
 
Displaying results 151 to 156 of 665
<<Back 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 Next>>

01-04-2007
T5: Can it Save Heathrow?
It’s one year till British Airways moves into its superterminal – but how super is it, asks Matt Rudd
Terminal 5 opened its giant glass doors to the press last week, marking the start of the one-year countdown to its opening on March 27, 2008. And it won’t be a minute too soon. Heathrow’s existing four terminals have a supposed capacity of 45m — it’s currently handling 68m. Which explains why it’s so horrible.
You might ask why BAA (profit last year £620m) allowed a 50% overcapacity... it wouldn’t, after all, be acceptable for a hotel to squeeze threesomes into double rooms. Not unless it were kinky. But BAA has been doing a lot of squeezing at Heathrow and it isn’t remotely kinky, it’s miserable. There are the inadequate facilities, the endless queues, the cheese-grater seating, the dingy, depressing maze of corridors, a luggage system close to and frequently exceeding breaking point, interminable coach transfers from gate to plane and... well, I could go on.

01-04-2007
JUMBOS TO ‘GLIDE’ INTO AUCKLAND
Chris Haslam
If you detect an eerie quiet on your next flight to New Zealand, don’t panic — the pilots are practising a new technique that could save fuel and reduce harmful emissions, by “gliding” into Auckland airport.
Initially limited to Boeing 747 jumbo jets operated by Qantas and Air New Zealand, the ecofriendly procedure involves switching engines to idle about 100 miles from the runway, and coasting in on a preagreed approach path.
Captain Mark Rammell, president of the New Zealand airline pilots’ association, told The Sunday Times that, while the notion of a 375-ton aircraft gliding into an airport seemed alarming, there were no safety concerns.
30-03-2007
Air Crews at Risk From Jet Lag
Air crews working on long-haul routes face serious health hazards from jet lag, including mood changes, headaches, irritability and even psychotic symptoms.

Contrary to popular belief, they do not build up resistance to the effects of flying long distances, added the scientists, from Liverpool John Moores University in a paper in The Lancet

Extracted from The Daily Telegraph, 30.3.07

30-03-2007
Stranded air travellers to get more rights
Air passengers are in line to get beefed-up rights to compensation when their flights are cancelled.

Regulations introduced by the EU in February 2005 force airlines to pay up to £400 to each passenger if a flight is grounded.

Travellers are also entitled either to be reimbursed for their tickets or transferred to another flight.


18-03-2007
BA SAT CORPSE IN FIRST CLASS
Steven Swinford
A BRITISH Airways passenger travelling first class has described how he woke up on a long-haul flight to find that cabin crew had placed a corpse in his row.
The body of a woman in her seventies, who died after the plane left Delhi for Heathrow, was carried by cabin staff from economy to first class, where there was more space. Her body was propped up in a seat, using pillows.
The woman’s daughter accompanied the corpse, and spent the rest of the journey wailing in grief.
Paul Trinder, who awoke to see the body at the end of his row, last week described the journey as “deeply disturbing”, and complained that the airline dismissed his concerns by telling him to “get over it”.

15-03-2007
SAVE THE PLANET: CANCEL THAT FLIGHT NOW
Camilla Cavendish Don’t believe that airline propoganda
It’s a vendetta. It’s class war. Those killjoy greens are trying to demonise the air industry and the package holiday. How dare that Mr Osborne and that Mr Cameron ask airlines to pay for the pollution they create. Don’t they know that air travel has broadened the horizons of millions? Don’t they know how much I spent on my holiday villa? Look, we all know flying is only a blip in global warming. So why pick on that?
When the debate boils over, when intelligent people tout the cheap return to Málaga as a totem of civil liberties, it is time to step back and look at the figures. The air industry has run a powerful campaign that has successfully lodged in many minds a reassuringly small figure of 2 per cent. But 2 per cent of what? It is correct to say that flying represents about 2 per cent of global greenhouse gas emissions. But that is not terribly relevant. That the UK’s total greenhouse gas emissions are only 2 per cent of the world’s has not stopped our leaders from pursuing drastic reduction.


<<Back 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 Next>>
Home/News | About Us | Our Objectives | Research | Air Law | Support the AH | Shop | Useful Links | Contact Us