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22-05-2007
Health fear over new airport scanners
By Pat Hagan
New X-Ray scanners at British airports could be exposing passengers to potentially dangerous levels of radiation, according to one senior radiologist.
The machines are designed to "strip search" passengers by using low-level X-Rays, which produce an image of their bodies, revealing whether they are secretly carrying weapons, explosives or illegal drugs.

21-05-2007
Travel Perks. You can’t beat your body clock. But you can fool it with a jet-l
By Cynthia Dial
Given the ubiquity of air travel, we\'re all expected to take jet lag in our stride these days, and be able to head straight from the red-eye to the morning\'s first appointment with barely a pause. In an age of deep-vein thrombosis and security scares, to be worried about mere jet lag even seems a little frivolous. But this isn\'t being fair on our systems: your mind may be jumping from the third coffee you\'ve gulped since landing, but fatigue, dehydration and insomnia are the body\'s reminders of how testing being strapped into a metal tube, and hurled across the other side of planet at hundreds of kilometers an hour, can often be. So while it\'s wise to do those in-flight stretches and stay hydrated during your journey, it\'s even better to arrange an hour or so of postflight pampering at your hotel spa. You\'ll unknot those muscles, brighten that smile and, with luck, avoid ending up face first in the notepad during the client meeting. Here are some of our favorite treatments for busting jet lag:

21-05-2007
Amsterdam - Schiphol body-scanning prompts no complaint yet
Amsterdam - Schiphol body-scanning prompts no complaint yet

Passengers hardly blinked at the introduction of a new scanning system this week at Amsterdam’s airport as part of anti-terrorism efforts, a spokeswoman said Wednesday, even though the machine in essence allows guards to peer beneath clothes.

“People figure, if this is going to let me get through the lines quicker, then I’ll do it,” said an airport.

The “active millimetre wave” technology system at Schiphol Airport is also being tested at airports in Mexico City and London, among others.

Passengers are given a brochure explaining how the machine works, but Snoerwang said there had been no objections about the sacrifice of privacy for security since two machines were inaugurated for public use Tuesday.

Extracted from International Herald Tribune 17.5.2007

13-05-2007
Welcome to America …….. from Mickey the immigration officer

By Stephen Adams
America\'s surly immigration officers are to get charm offensive lessons from Disney to lure back tourists put off by their intimidating \'welcome\'.
They will be given tips from the creators of Mickey Mouse following falling visitor numbers - and a survey that revealed 70 per cent of those who have dropped the US as a destination cite an aggressive reception as the reason.
Since security was stepped up after 9/11, British visitors have complained of mistreatment at airport immigration, exceptionally long queues and excessive interrogations.

03-05-2007
Bmi chief accuses BAA of forcing passengers to shop
By David Robertson

Sir Michael Bishop, the chairman of bmi, has criticised BAA for using increased security as a pretext for getting passengers to spend more time shopping at its airports.
Echoing the concern of a number of airlines, Sir Michael believes that BAA’s lack of investment in security scanners has forced passengers to arrive at airports earlier.
BAA recommends that passengers arrive four hours before an international flight and three hours before a European flight to clear security. Longer check-in periods give passengers more time to shop in the terminals.

02-05-2007
Airports must now test liquids in hand luggage
Department for Transport admits that new security requirements will cause inconvenience
Mark Frary
Passengers travelling through UK airports may face further security delays from this week as a result of a new requirement on airports to carry out random tests on liquids carried within hand luggage.
The Department for Transport (DfT) issued new rules yesterday to the UK’s airports asking them to introduce testing of liquids contained within the clear plastic bag carried within hand baggage. Passengers are currently allowed to carry up to one litre of liquids in containers of not more than 100ml in a clear, sealable plastic bag.
A spokesman for Heathrow said that the airport had been trialling the testing process, which involves placing litmus paper in the liquid under test, since January. “We have been running the trial as if the DfT’s rules had already been implemented. We are already geared up for testing and there should not be any impact on passengers.”
In a letter leaked on a pilots\' discussion forum, the DfT told airports: “It is anticipated that this introduction will cause inconvenience to customers, airport staff and crew travelling through UK airports and will potentially impact the speed of security processing.”


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