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15-08-2008
Oxygen Cylinder May Have Caused Jumbo Jet Blast
An exploding oxygen cylinder may have ripped open the fuselage of a Qantas Jumbo jet that had to make an emergency landing, investigators said yesterday.

Such a blast would have major implications for 747 aircraft worldwide, said the Australian Civil Aviation Safety Authority.

It has sent experts to Manila in the Phillippines to inspect the aircraft, which was on its way from London to Melbourne on Friday with 346 passengers when there was an explosion and the cabin depressurised.

The Investigators said one of the oxygen tanks stored near the damaged area was missing. Debris believed to be from the tank has been found scattered through the cargo hold.

Of added concern is why a cylinder, which provides emergency oxygen for the flight deck, would have exploded - a worry that has resulted in maintenance staff checking every cylinder on every one of the fleet of Qantas\'s 30 747 aircraft.

Extracted from The Daily Mail 28.7.08
15-08-2008
Airlines were warned over jumbo fault
The airline involved in a near-disaster on a jumbo jet last week was warned three months ago about the possible dangers of brackets supporting the oxygen tanks.

Investigators believe these tanks could have caused the explosion which ripped a hole in the Qantas jet carrying 350 passengers and crew from London to Melbourne as it crossed the South China Sea.

They have identified a missing cylinder from a bank of two which supplied oxygen to the cabin crew.

The warning from the US based Federal Aviation Authority in April was issued to all airlines operating Boeing 747-400s.

It followed a report that some oxygen cylinder support brackets might not have been properly heat-treated and could cause oxygen leakage. Australia\'s Civil Aviation Safety Authority then issued a similar directive.

At the weekend, aviation officials in the country ordered an inspection of oxygen bottles aboard the Qantas 747 fleet.

A spokesman for the airline refused to comment.

Extracted from The Daily Mail July 29, 2008
15-08-2008
Jets in collision drama
By Ray Massey Transport Editor
Passengers shock as two planes are caught up in rear-end runway smash
Two jets carrying 288 passengers collided on the runway of one of Britain\'s busiest airports yesterday.
The \'rear-end\' smash at Manchester Airport caused at least 4million of damage.
15-08-2008
Airline probe after third jet emergency
Safety standards at Australian airline Qantas are being investigated after its third emergency landing in nine days.

A Boeing 767 carrying 200 passengers bound for Manila in the Phillippines on Saturday had to return to Sydney after air traffic controllers saw hydraulic fluid spraying out of one of the wings.

Six days ago a jet on a domestic flight was forced to return to Adelaide after a landing gear door would not close.

But the worst incident took place on July 25 when an explosion on a Boeing 747 flying from London to Melbourne blew a hole in the fuselage in mid air.

An exploding oxygen cylinder is thought to be the cause of the blast, which led to decompression in the passenger cabin.

The jet landed safely in Manila despite damaged navigational instruments.

Announcing the review yesterday, Australia\'s Civil Aviation Safety Authority said it had no evidence of problems at Qantas.

However, spokesman Peter Gibson added We think its prudent to go in with a special team and take a look at a range of operational issues within Qantas.

David Cox, head of engineering at Qantas, said its maintenance and safety procedures were first class, adding We have no issue with this review.

Extracted from Daily Mail 4.8.08
15-08-2008
Passenger hell as jet plunges 26,000ft in five minutes after a drop in cabin pre
By Tom Kelly and David Derbyshire
Last updated at 8:39 AM on 27th August 2008
Terrified passengers on board a holiday jet feared they were about to die after it plummeted 26,000ft following a sudden drop in cabin pressure.
Holidaymakers screamed as the Ryanair plane went into a five-minute dive without warning during the flight from Bristol to Spain.
The aircraft levelled out at around 8,000ft before making an emergency landing in central France.


14-07-2008
1000 bags a day are lost at Heathrows Terminal 5
By Sophie Borland
Heathrow\'s Terminal 5 is still in chaos with nearly 1,000 bags going missing every day, it was claimed yesterday.
This challenges British Airways\' assurances that the system is now running smoothly.



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