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12-07-2007
Effect of Aircraft-Cabin Altitude on Passenger Discomfort
J. Michael Muhm, M.D., M.P.H., Paul B. Rock, D.O., Ph.D., Dianne L. McMullin, Ph.D., Stephen P. Jones, Ph.D., I.L. Lu, Ph.D., Kyle D. Eilers, David R. Space, and Aleksandra McMullen, M.S.
Abstract Background Acute mountain sickness occurs in some unacclimatized persons who travel to terrestrial altitudes at which barometric pressures are the same as those in commercial aircraft during flight. Whether the effects are similar in air travelers is unknown.
Methods We conducted a prospective, single-blind, controlled hypobaric-chamber study of adult volunteers to determine the effect of barometric pressures equivalent to terrestrial altitudes of 650, 4000, 6000, 7000, and 8000 ft (198, 1219, 1829, 2134, and 2438 m, respectively) above sea level on arterial oxygen saturation and the occurrence of acute mountain sickness and discomfort as measured by responses to the Environmental Symptoms Questionnaire IV during a 20-hour simulated flight.

09-07-2007
Itís not jet lag, itís Ďaltitude sicknessí
CHICAGO Many of the effects of long-distance flight may be the result of altitude sickness rather than fatigue or jet lag, experiments carried out by Boeing doctors suggest.

Headache, nausea and dizziness, fatigue and a general feeling of malaise are symptoms of acute mountain sickness, which 75 per cent of people will experience at altitudes of more than 10,000ft (3,000m).

Aircraft fly much higher, but are generally pressurised to a minimum of 565mm of mercury, equivalent to an altitude of 8,000ft, when flying at their maximum height.


09-07-2007
Boeing unveils the modern air passengerís dream: less jet lag and less carbon gu
By David Millward
Transport Correspondent in Seattle
Boeing has designed a plane that it claims will lessen the effects of jet lag on passengers and lessen their guilt over CO2 emissions.
The American aircraft giant unveiled its latest model yesterday amid promises that it will be kinder to passengers and to the environment.

05-07-2007
Holidaymakers scream as plane plunges 23,000ft
By Ray Massey, Transport Editor

Terrified passengers on a holiday jet thought they were about to die as it plummeted 23,000ft.

Amid fears of a terror attack, the 150 passengers and crew on an easyJet flight from Gatwick to Palma in Majorca frantically grabbed for oxygen masks.

In a manoeuvre designed to overcome a fall in cabin pressure, the jet continued to plunge until it reached 12,000ft and levelled off.


05-07-2007
In-flight illness fears
Questions & Answers
In-flight illness fears
By Dr Thomas Stuttaford.
An anxious Scotswoman has written to us about in-flight health. She says that she is not a hypochondriac but worries before flying on holiday about who would care for her if she was taken ill en route. She fears waking up in an under-equipped hospital in remotest sub-Saharan Africa. Are these anxieties justified?

05-07-2007
High altitude flights spark symptoms
By Gene Emery
BOSTON (Reuters) - Feeling a little achy, lightheaded or short of breath on a long plane flight? A new study suggests you might be suffering from a mild form of altitude sickness.
Until now, such symptoms had been attributed to jet lag, dehydration, air contamination or being stuck in a cramped seat for hours.
Researchers report that true altitude sickness -- with its nausea, vomiting and sleep disturbances -- was no more likely in volunteers in simulated airplane cabins where the pressure was equivalent to 8,000 feet above sea level than it was when the pressure was closer to sea level.
But after three hours of exposure to cabin pressures equivalent to 7,000 to 8,000 feet, the simulated fliers were more likely than others to report backaches, headaches, shortness of breath, light-headedness and impaired coordination.



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